Organization Development Network of Western New York

Bosnia A Case Study in Leadership & Cultural Transformation ODN of WNY November 2014 Meeting

 

Organization Development Network (ODN) of WNY

November 2014 Meeting Announcement

Bosnia – A Case Study in Leadership & Cultural Transformation

By: Anne Moretti (Moretti Consulting)

 

 

Meeting Overview:

The Bosnian War was an international armed conflict that took place in Bosnia and Herzegovina between 6 April 1992 and 14 December 1995. The war came about as a result of the breakup of Yugoslavia; it was also the first case of genocide in Europe since World War II. Following the signing of the Dayton Peace Treaty in 1996, leadership from the Buffalo General Hospital and Buffalo Children’s Hospital were awarded a 2-year, USAID White House grant to partner with the University Clinical Center Tuzla and the University of Tuzla among others. The purpose of the partnership was to improve the quality of care in Bosnia, strengthen relationships with the Bosnian Ministry of Health and other government agencies, and to transition the culture from fledgling East Bloc governance to Western management practices post-war. Nearly 16 years later, the US government continues to publish progress. The presentation will cover a project overview, cultural and leadership issues, change strategies, and "stories" of how the partnership worked together to implement initiatives (such as centers of excellence) and transform the infrastructure across the Cantons (regions) of the newly formed country.

 

Presenter:

Anne M. Moretti brings over twenty years of senior level management experience in the areas of Board and Executive Development, Leadership Development, Change Management & Culture Transformation,
Organizational Development, Assessments, Planning, Quality Improvement and large/small group facilitation. Her clients include health care systems, nursing homes, pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, construction and manufacturing companies, physician groups, community groups, education, and government.

Location Notes:

The Canisius Center for Professional Development is located in Amherst, NY. Directions: Take the 290 expressway, and exit on Millersport Highway going north. At the first light (by the Marriott), make a left onto Flint Road. Make a left turn on to Maple Road. At the next signal, make a left turn on to Corporate Parkway. At the stop sign, turn right. The building is on your left side. The parking lot (no charge) is on your right. Complimentary coffee is available.

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Resolving Conflict to Promote Workplace Inclusion – An Organizational Challenge

Organization Development Network (ODN) of WNY

June 2014 Meeting Announcement

Resolving Conflict to Promote Workplace Inclusion: An Organizational Challenge

Facilitator: Sandra W. Whitmore

 

 

Meeting Overview:

What is “conflict” and how does it affect the workplace? The word may cause us to think of fighting, arguments, anger, disagreements, and hurt feelings. We may also see conflict as a natural, necessary part of life in the workplace which creates tension and can result in change.

Are disagreements or difference of opinion bad? Of course not, but how conflict is handled can be negative or positive. In this workshop we will explore storytelling and multi-partiality concepts in mediation. We’ll consider how these concepts might be applied in our organizations to generate new understanding and result in positive change. Come excited, engaged, and ready to participate!

 
Learning Objectives:
  • Learn how to explore new ideas and new approaches with a social justice lens in dealing with conflict.
  • What qualities and abilities a successful mediator needs to be effective.
  • What mediation is and how it can be useful in working through challenges in the workplace.

This model is from the Social Justice Mediation Institute, Dr. Leah Wing

Presenter:

Sandra W. Whitmore began her career at RIT in the College of Liberal Arts in 1999 and in 2003 joined the Office of the President. Sandra currently serves as the Director of Operations and RIT’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for the Division of Diversity & Inclusion. Managing the daily operations, directly oversees the areas of Public Relations/Marketing & Multicultural Programs, as well as the official representative for compliance issues for Title IX, and constructs methods to achieve the Division of Diversity & Inclusion’s goals. Supervised by the Vice President and Associate Provost for Diversity & Inclusion the role is critical to the overall achievement of RIT’s mission of achieving best in class in the areas of diversity and inclusion in higher education.

 

Location Notes:

The Canisius Center for Professional Development is located in Amherst, NY. Directions: Take the 290 expressway, and exit on Millersport Highway going north. At the first light (by the Marriott), make a left onto Flint Road. Make a left turn on to Maple Road. At the next signal, make a left turn on to Corporate Parkway. At the stop sign, turn right. The building is on your left side. The parking lot (no charge) is on your right. Complimentary coffee is available.

Creating a Culture Change to Support Conflict Resolution – Susan Woods

Posted in Conflict Resolution, Facilitation, ODN of WNY Members, Programs by Michael Cardus on May 1, 2012

Organizational Development Network (ODN) of WNY

May 2012 Meeting Announcement

“Creating a Culture Change to Support Conflict Resolution”

by

Susan Woods

Organization Development Network of WNY

Friday, May 11, 2012
8:30 am to 11:30 am (8:30 am to 9:00 am – networking; 9:00 am to 11:30 am – meeting)
New Era Cap, 160 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202
RSVP to Kate Kane at kmkane@mtb.com

Parking is available in the New Era visitor’s lot, on the street, or in various lots/ramps located within a block of New Era. Refreshments are available for purchase in the New Era cafeteria on the third floor.

 

Meeting Overview

An organization’s culture is reflected in how it functions, the unspoken but shared assumptions about how things are done around here that influence behavioral choices and interactions. According to Edgar Schein, culture is reflected not so much in what an organization says about itself, as in how it operates.

Culture is manifested through the values in use.
This session is designed as a facilitated interactive case study simulation to develop an organizational strategy to introduce a collaborative approach to conflict resolution and implement an effective culture change process. The first half of the session will introduce a three phase approach to collaborative conflict resolution and provide opportunity for hands-on experience using the process. The facilitator will then introduce a set of basic concepts for thinking through change strategy. In the second half of the session, we will divide into smaller groups of three or four to identify recommendations for a proposed change strategy. Groups will share and exchange ideas in open discussion.

There’s no one right answer. This will be an opportunity for participants to learn from one another and discuss how this resonates with their own experiences.

Questions to be considered:

1. Why can’t we just announce change and have it happen?
2. How do we introduce new behaviors for day-to-day conflict encounters that support a collaboration approach to conflict resolution?
3. How do we engage others and win buy-in for new approaches?

Program Benefits

Upon completion of this session, participants will:
• Improve their understanding of collaborative conflict resolution
• Consider a three-phase process for conflict resolution
• Explore a basic framework for thinking thorough organizational culture change
• Gain insight by working with colleagues to propose a culture change strategy

Speaker Bio

Susan Woods is a member of the WNY ODN Planning Committee. She is Managing Partner of Henderson Woods, LLC, a local firm specializing in training, facilitation and participatory consulting services in the areas of diversity and inclusion, conflict resolution and labor-management relations. For twenty-five years, she was Senior Extension Faculty with Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations where the major portion of her career was affiliated with the Program for Employment and Workplace Systems, PEWS, and the Organizational Change group.

Conflict Resolution. More Notes

Posted in Coaching, Conflict Resolution, Meeting Notes, ODN of WNY Members by Michael Cardus on May 20, 2009

Below is the self-study tutorial on conflict resolution that might be appropriate to post and that those attending last Friday’s meeting might find interesting.  We didn’t get to the example that used, but I had included it in case there was time.   Also attached is the working paper that describes the willingness, readiness, opportunity framework.

Finally here are the Netter Principles for Organizational Inclusion, which we mentioned during the session and I promised to send out. 

Looking over my slides, I think the essential parts of the presentation are:

Diversity is about people;  specifically the differences and similarities and diversity of thought or multiple perspectives

Inclusion is about organization; specifically the way an organization configures interaction, opportunity, communication and decision-making in order to operationalize the potential of it’s diversity.  Inclusive organizations are characterized by 1) fairness,  2) recognition and 3) influence.

Diversity is a resource to organizations because of talent and perspective, i.e. diversity of thought.

The challenge of diversity is two-fold.  On the one hand, greater diversity increases the likelyhood for misunderstanding and conflict;  on the other, greater diversity increased the potential for creativity, innovation and solution-finding.  The challenge is to “make diversity work” in order to “make diversity matter.”

Engaging diversity of thought as a resource requires willingness to share diverse perspectives, organizational readiness for learning from diverse perspectives and opportunity to engage.  Those who are diverse control willingness; the organization creates readiness and opportunity.  Moving toward an organizational culture that is able to diffuse and/or resolve diversity conflict is an essential step in supporting readiness and creating willingness.

Diversity conflict is difficult because it often it is not possible to separate the people from the problem.  Diversity conflict may be driven as much by issues of respect and relationship as much as by substance. It often involves group as well as individual identity and is rooted in history and memory.  It may turn on unintended and unrecognized interpersonal and intergroup dynamics.  Finally it often involved power imbalance and elements of injustice. 

In addition, in organizations with diversity conflict, there is a need

1) to find a solution that works for everyone; 

 2) avoid driving anyone out; and

3) discovering new understandings of identity that leave everyone feeling good about themselves or seeing something they can be proud of.

For these reasons, diffusing and/or resolving diversity conflict requires taking the time to learn from diversity perspectives. It is often not productive to rush to solution because the parties may be interacting from very different assumptions and objective incidents may have very different subjective meanings. Storytelling is an important first step.

Susan Woods

Conflict Facilitation Meeting Notes from May 2009

Posted in Conflict Resolution, Facilitation, Meeting Notes by Michael Cardus on May 20, 2009

OD Network of WNY

Meeting Notes

Participating: Charlene Brumley, Sandy Budmark, Barbara Bunker, Mike Cardus, Sarah Gilson, Kate Kane, Marti Kaplan, Rita Markle, Jeannie Miller, Brian Pettit, Linda Snyder, Pete Wendel, Jody Wiechec, Susan Woods

Susan presented her current thinking about Diversity Conflict from an Organizational Systems Perspective.  We all appreciated a good look into the evolution of her thinking on this topic, and Susan appreciated our reactions and feedback.  She shared the essential parts of the presentation:

 

  • Diversity is about people:  specifically the differences and similarities and diversity of thought or multiple perspectives
  • Inclusion is about organization: specifically the way an organization configures interaction, opportunity, communication and decision-making in order to operationalize the potential of its diversity.  Inclusive organizations are characterized by
    • fairness
    • recognition and
    • influence

 

  • Diversity is a resource to organizations because of talent and perspective, i.e. diversity of thought.
  • The challenge of diversity is two-fold.  On the one hand, greater diversity increases the likelihood for misunderstanding and conflict; on the other, greater diversity increased the potential for creativity, innovation and solution-finding.  The challenge is to “make diversity work” in order to “make diversity matter.”
  • Engaging diversity of thought as a resource requires willingness to share diverse perspectives, organizational readiness for learning from diverse perspectives and opportunity to engage.  Those who are diverse control willingness; the organization creates readiness and opportunity.  Moving toward an organizational culture that is able to diffuse and/or resolve diversity conflict is an essential step in supporting readiness and creating willingness.
  • Diversity conflict is difficult because it often it is not possible to separate the people from the problem.  Diversity conflict may be driven as much by issues of respect and relationship as much as by substance. It often involves group as well as individual identity and is rooted in history and memory.  It may turn on unintended and unrecognized interpersonal and intergroup dynamics.  Finally it often involved power imbalance and elements of injustice.
  • In addition, in organizations with diversity conflict, there is a need to
    • find a solution that works for everyone
    • avoid driving anyone out, and
    • discover new understandings of identity that leave everyone feeling good about themselves or seeing something they can be proud of.
  • For these reasons, diffusing and/or resolving diversity conflict requires taking the time to learn from diversity perspectives. It is often not productive to rush to solution because the parties may be interacting from very different assumptions and objective incidents may have very different subjective meanings. Storytelling is an important first step.